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[Sorceror & Sword] The Heart of Africa
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Sean M
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yip - no need for the flashback structure... And there's no real need for 'we' to be mindful of the choices I have - I just have to be mindful!

Thanks,

Sean
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hix



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We played the third session on Monday, wrapping up the story in a downbeat, deadly climax that lead to a couple of expected (and unexpected) deaths and a wry little coda.

I don’t have time to write up a big, complete post of the session just now. Instead, I’ll post the summary of the main events and expand on things later. Sean, Gino (when you’re back from holiday), jump on in with any of your recollections about events or points that got raised during the game or whatever.

***

Going into this session, I knew the following situational questions were going to have to be addressed:

- Will Rasputin sacrifice his Baby to Jalali or not?
- Will Rasputin and Sebastian summon any demons (to either heal Sebastian or take on the Contessa)?
- Will Rasputin and Sebastian attack the Contessa?
- Will Rasputin and Sebastian attack Kigongo?


The session broke into six big blocks.

1. Going over some of the rules; seeing if there were any issues lingering from the last session; sitting down with dinner and doing a ‘previously On’ for the last session.

2. Summoning Isaam the Jackal (a demon)

3. Rasputin and Sebastian argue about whether to kill the Contessa

4. Azaan is Banished.

5. An out-of-game discussion about whether the story had finished.

6. The confrontation with Kigongo and the Swarm.
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Mashugenah
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow; I wish you'd waited for the whole encillada, because that summary just does not even touch on the issues I could see just from reading this thread. Sad Go on Steve, give us the rest! Smile
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hix



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 406
Location: Poison'd

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wish I could [have done the whole thing in one post], Mash, but believe me, this way it'll get done quicker. So, to kick things off ...

***

1. Going over some of the rules; seeing if there were any issues lingering from the last session; sitting down with dinner and doing a ‘previously On’ for the last session.

Sean and I discussed movie trilogies on the way to the game, and the way it’s good to re-establish why we like the main characters in each film. You can’t assume your audience cares about the characters just because they’ve seen a previous movie in the series. I was mindful of this as we built up to starting the game.

I broached the topic of using sorcery. Sean had been ... hesitant (?) about summoning demons BUT Gino launched into a rant about how Sebastian was going to get himself a demonic, combat-effective sidekick and kick Azaan’s arse. The contrast was great – it not only manifested in-character during the game, but attitudes about using demons become a defining feature of the resolution.

We talked about the sort of demon Gino wanted to summon. But I kept the conversation to generalities, as inspired by this thread.

Then I made sure everyone understood that a low Humanity score still meant you could behave in exactly the same ways as a character with a high Humanity. This was very clear to everyone - Sean, probably from our discussion on this thread; Gino, from his previous experience with Sorceror.

I gave Gino a list of his options for overcoming his 16 penalties (see the previous page). Gino used nearly all of them, but his Will rolls were a particular feature of this session.

When we did the ‘Previously On’, I found it broke down very naturally into strands. The business deals and getting the tender consisted mostly of me describing significant scenes. When we changed topic to the contessa and what she’d done, that’s when Sean and Gino picked up and started exchanging memories of the previous couple of sessions.

Then I read out the end of the Session 2 post about the carnage, and we launched into play.
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Steve

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hix



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, just like the previous session, I decided not to put too much pressure on to start with. Just let Sean and Gino and me get back into the world.

To start with, I described Sebastian hallucinating. His hallucination was of Kigongo summoning the Swarm, and of Sebastian’s parents sitting in Brighton Beach deckchairs applauding as the demon arrived. This was my way of incorporating the Kigongo cross-cut material from last session ‘coherently’ into the game.

The last thing in that hallucination was Sebastian’s mother asking whether he loved Makeda. I left Gino about 15 seconds to give us an answer to that – and he struggled mightly but couldn’t decide. So we left it, which was a good choice as – it turns out – that question was pretty much the last thing to be decided in this story.

Back in the room, Rasputin was ordering the Contessa to treat Sebastian, and she was obeying. Sean, was there anything going on for you in those exchanges? I think at one point, Rasputin said, “Of course I wouldn’t hurt my child.” I found this pretty impressive considering that your hold over the Contessa was her fear for Yvan’s safety.

Both the Contessa’s demons were in Need, and messing with her. Her parasite demon had its eye on seducing Baraka, and Azaan was getting tardy about obeying her instructions. I think a lot of good stuff in this session came out of playing the demons really hard - their wants, their needs, the impact they have on their Sorcerors.

The main part of this scene was that Sebastian wanted Rasputin to summon a demon for him. We had a long, in-character conversation where Rasputin tried to convince Sebastian that it was a bad idea. There was a lot of neat stuff in here, with Rasputin (by implication) referring back to previous unplayed adventures where Sebastian had disdained using demonic help.

I felt like there wasn’t enough ‘happening’ during this part of the scene – or rather, that I wasn’t doing enough - but I withheld throwing any Bangs at them and focused on their conversation and the upcoming sorcery instead.

Gino came up with a pretty powerful combat focused demon, a jackal called Isaam (it means ‘Guard’). Its Need is to prey on the weak … Gino was uncomfortable with it, suggested ‘attack the strong’ instead. After I thought about it, I realised would make Sebastian into a bit of a hero, so I said no. The Needs of all the demons in this setting seem to compromise the identities of the Sorcerors, so it felt right to try and turn Sebastian into a bit of a bully.

Sean and I were disturbed by the summoning. Me just by mentioning it was going to happen; Sean, for reasons he can go into if he wants to.

We worked it through, came up with lots of roleplaying and colour. Because the demon was an Immanent (already in the world), there was only a Contact roll. I gave a quiet description of how reality sheared apart and then Sean made a Humanity loss for Rasputin – which, I think, he failed.

As soon as Isaam the Jackal showed up, it had a fully formed character. Biting, prowling, disliking Rasputin. Sebastian successfully Bound it, and from there I’m pretty sure we moved on to the next scene – after a tiny little cut-scene which involved transporting Sebastian back to his rooms.
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hix



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, I forgot. During the interlude between scenes, and all through the following scene, I was roleplaying Yvan, Rasputin’s baby, as hard as I could. It took me a long time during prep for this session to figure out how to play Yvan – but basically I decided that he would be (a) not annoying, (b) smart and curious, (c) share a similar backstory to Rasputin, in that he never knew his father, and (d) be Rasputin’s child in terms of temperament.

This last point (d) manifested particularly when Yvan got scared of something. I forget exactly what – it may have been of one of the demons. I had Yvan chastise himself for being scared – to which Rasputin said that it was okay to be scared.

At that point, Sean and I had a moment. I knew that Sean felt that Rasputin felt that Yvan was being weak. So I pushed back – and had Yvan insist that his perfectly natural 3-year old behaviour was completely unacceptable. After a few moments of that, Rasputin (I believe) started treated Yvan with a bit more respect.

***

Okay, so the PCs get back to their apartment – where, of course, Nadra is waiting for them. They left her there, under the guard of some of Makeda’s entourage, last session.

I asked Gino if he wanted to participate in this early part of the scene, and he said he was comfortable having Sebastian be unconscious. If I recall correctly, this didn’t stop him from participating in what happened by offering comments and jokes, but I’m not sure.

Anyway, Rasputin had Sebastian put down at one side of the room. We played out a little conflict between the guards and Rasputin (keying off one of Rasputin’s Prices – that he’s hated by male authority). Once again (just like when Rasputin was laughed at in the bar last session), there was no dice rolling. I could tell just from the way Sean was performing his character that these guards would back the hell down under Rasputin’s stare.

After they left (and, oh boy, did I know they were going right to Makeda to tell them that Sebastian was critically injured), I decided to completely repeat the bang from last week with Nadra – that she wouldn’t remember who Rasputin was and would gradually get sicker in his presence. The difference this time being that Rasputin knew it was coming.

There was some nice stuff here – Nadra liking Yvan, the suggestion (for me at least) that they would make a good family with Rasputin. And that Rasputin sent her away incredibly quickly. For Sean, I guess, dealing with Nadra wasn’t what he was interested in right now.

***

If I remember correctly, Sean wanted to know what’s the Contessa’s plan was. To start with, I deliberately misinterpreted this and said what she’d been aiming to do. The Contessa wanted destroy all of Rasputin’s reasons for remaining in Africa. To start with, this meant spoiling the negotiations. The easiest way to spoil that was to sleep with Sebastian, knowing that Makeda’s reaction would upset Mr Koli.

Now the Contessa wanted to … well my memory of this part isn’t too clear. I’m pretty sure she realised her plans to marry Rasputin and live with him in Russia were in ruins. However, that didn’t stop her from making one final pitch where she described her vision of Rasputin ruling Russia by her side – an image that I made sure to paint in terms as close to Rasputin’s eventual Destiny as I could.

Rasputin didn’t buy it.

So the Contessa said she wanted to leave the city – with Yvan, if she possibly could. Rasputin agreed that that was a good idea and dismissed her. As she left, we made up a bit of detail about the city, that it was connected to the ground by elevators, and that she would be waiting for Rasputin there.

***

Pretty much as soon as the Contessa was gone, we had the big Rasputin and Sebastian conversation. This was pretty much the centre-piece of the session.

The question to be answered was “What should we do about her?”

Rasputin was all in favour of killing her. Sebastian was very much against. It eventually triggered a Humanity Loss roll for Rasputin, which he succeeded at, when Rasputin point-blank said … and I forget the specifics … that he was going to end the Contessa’s life, and make sure that she didn’t come back to trouble them again. It was damn cold, and me and (I think) Gino both drew in breath when he said it.

One thing about the Humanity Loss roll – after discussing it with Sean, we decided that, unless the situation changed, it would cover the act of killing the Contessa as well … that Rasputin was resolute in his decision. As you’ll see towards the end, this wasn’t exactly how things played out. They played out much worse.

A few more things about this conversation:

- It kept getting interrupted by me role-playing the demons (Jackal and Spider Totem) meeting each other. This undercut Rasputin and Sebastian several times, but I thought it was important to establish the demons as independent characters who weren’t necessarily concerned about their masters’ plans.

- I felt odd that I didn’t have any Bangs to throw in here … so I introduced the bonus dice again. These are my reward for good points of argument or roleplaying. They can get used in the event of the players making rolls to see which character ‘wins’ the argument., thinking that they had worked well last session during the negotiation with Mr Koli.

This led to a big discussion between me and Sean about player autonomy – particularly that this was a decision that concerned Rasputin’s destiny, and as such it shouldn’t be determined mechanically in any way. It was also a conflict of interest between the two PCs, which is when the Sorceror resolution system’s designed to be applied. Also, I felt that there needed to be a push towards a resolution of the conversation. In hindsight, I think that just figuring out when the conversation was ‘over’ might have been enough, but at any rate, dice were rolled and Rasputin ended up with a bonus die in his favour towards killing the Contessa.

***

What else was there? Oh yeah, Jalali become a key player in the last stage of the scene. Remember he’s the Spider Totem demon who wants to eat Yvan in exchange for telling Rasputin some knowledge he desperately wants.

At one point during the scene, Yvan started crawling into Jalali’s room. Rasputin stopped Yvan and told him to never to go in there. Jalali took this to mean he wasn’t going to get fed.

So from then on, I shifted Jalali into rebellion against Rasputin.

Rasputin wanted to use Jalali’s power to fight their enemies (Azaan, the Contessa and maybe Kigongo). Jalali told Rasputin he was only going to get a little bit of Jalali’s power, and that things were going to change around here. I forget the specifics, but Jalali really hammered home how angry he was with Rasputin and how much he was going to make Rasputin’s life difficult.

So Rasputin threw a temper tantrum, smashed Jalali over to the other side of the room. This was the key to the rest of the session – and also a great Sorceror vs. Demon moment.
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Sean M
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the heavy write-up Steve - it's been very interesting, and has been sparking off a couple of thoughts.

The key one for me is the crystalisation of something I was driving at in my earlier posts: that without intervention Rasputin the character was going to pursue his revenge. And that I as a player was not going to stop following what appeared to be the natural path for my character.

In an earlier post you mentioned the idea of 'author-stance', and that was what we were playing. Well, I have to confess, I totally missed that point when it came to this session. And in fact more broadly as a role-player I've realised that I will take the character where I think the character is going to go in the story. Which is a fascinating thing to learn about myself as a player!

In fact, the idea of an 'author-stance' which enables me as a player to decide actions contrary to what I see as the will of the character is something I don't really like. Because I view those kind of actions as unmotivated within the story. To expect the character to behave differently, I need to have changed the past of the character. Which was something I was trying to achieve by suggesting the two timeline structure!

This is not to say that I as a player was powerless to stop Rasputin as a character from pursuing the path he did.

What I as a player should have done, and what I forgot to do, was help create opportunities in the world Rasputin moved in (the story of the game) that might add some doubts to Rasputin's drive for revenge. I could have helped create an environment where we could see a different side to the Contessa. This is in turn could have heightened Rasputin's choice about whether to pursue revenge or not.

Instead I personally bought into Rasputin's drive for revenge. Player and character were locked into the same course of action. I wasn't looking for ways to heighten Rasputin's choice. A lost opportunity in hindsight I feel.

****

Another comment I would make is that starting the session with Sebastian seeing a vision of the swarm probably made a significant difference to how this session played out.

A key conflict between Rasputin and Sebastian in this session was whether to deal with the Contessa (Rasputin's top choice) or with the swarm (Sebastian's top choice). Rasputin ended up agreeing with Sebastian to face the swarm first, thus apparently deferring his revenge.

I wonder whether the swarm would have been quite so important to Sebastian if the episode hadn't started in that fashion (don't know - because I can't read Gino's mind! - which he probably appreciates...)

Cheers,

Sean
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sean, although I asked you this in person, could you talk a bit about why you felt uncomfortable simply introducing a piece of relevant backstory into the game?
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Sean M
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It never occurred to me to introduce a piece of relevant backstory into the game. So that's the key reason!

But as to why it would feel uncomfortable to me... It would feel unmotivated if it was introduced too late in the overall story. Where has such a thing come from? I would feel utterly disappointed if I was watching the end of an episode and Rasputin suddenly did something different from what I expected because of some prior incident I'd never heard of before. The process of constructing story in a game is very much like that for me.

Now I'm sure one could assume that this incident has played in the series to date, but we the audience (consisting of yourself, myself and Gino and by extension anyone else reading this write-up) wouldn't have 'seen it'. So though it's theoretically sound that such an incident has happened, and I could easily invent it, it wouldn't feel right to me. It would actually feel like cheating.

I had a very different, perhaps opposite, experience last year playing Mountain Witch. My character was a closed gruff samurai with a complex backstory. My issue was how to express this complex backstory. It wasn't in play, but it still existed for me, and I felt it needed to be in play before I could fairly act on it (a mission of revenge against your character Steve). I felt it would have been very unsatisfying if I had lopped off your character's head without having explained my motives. So in this scenario the backstory existed for me and so was in play, but had not been expressed around the table, therefore I didn't want to act fully on it yet. (And from a 'story' point of view, I could easily imagine my samurai lopping off his enemy's head without warning. But that wouldn't have been a very satisfying role-playing experience, arguably...)

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Sean
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Now I'm sure one could assume that this incident has played in the series to date, but we the audience (consisting of yourself, myself and Gino and by extension anyone else reading this write-up) wouldn't have 'seen it'. So though it's theoretically sound that such an incident has happened, and I could easily invent it, it wouldn't feel right to me. It would actually feel like cheating.


Sean and I have discussed this in the last couple of weeks. Our conclusion was that we could have created some relevant backstory at the table. However, the new backstory would need to be equal in quality to the game we were playing.

In other words, we’ve all worked to set up a dilemma for the PC – a situation with no easy solutions. If we then intro some lame deus ex machina backstory that creates an easy answer to the problem, it’ll feel artificial and forced and unsatisfying to us.

On the other hand, if we take our time, we can explore what’s going on and come up with an idea for a backstory that everyone at the table’s excited by. That’s good. However, that process could take anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour to hash out.
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hix



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scene 4 opened at the elevator shaft, with Rasputin and Sebastian arriving to meet the Contessa.

They found her at the tail-end of a massive battle with Makeda (daughter of the dictator, and Sebastian’s woman). The bodies of 40 of Makeda’s soldiers lay on the ground of the plaza between them, and Azaan was about to leap on the now-undefended Makeda.

I’d decided that while Rasputin & Sebastian had been arguing, Makeda had found out Sebastian was injured. Her reaction was two-fold. First, she sent a healer to Sebastian. Second, she decided to arrest the Contessa. And then execute her. After all, Makeda’s still jealous of the Contessa sleeping with Sebastian (you know, the Kicker).

Anyway, the Contessa resists. Azaan slaughters all the soldiers, and now he’s about to leap on Makeda.

“Contessa, this is madness!” yells Rasputin, trying to stop her. It was a powerful performance by Sean, and it launched us into the big seven-way conflict of the session.

Sebastian and his Jackal demon wanted to put the hurt on Azaan. Rasputin was trying to convince the Contessa to call off the attack on Makeda.

Makeda was trying to escape Azaan. The Contessa wasn’t trying to do anything (she’d given her orders already).

Azaan was the only one who I didn’t have a handle on. I was nervous about killing Makeda, so I feel I pulled my punch here. Azaan wanted to grab hold of Makeda, so the Contessa could deal with her. This felt a bit soft to me, but – like I say – I was reluctant to push it any harder.

Rasputin & Sebastian went to war. This battle was far more evenly matched than the end of last session. In either the first or second round, the Jackal demon got some Special Damage Lethal on Azaan. This was sweet payback for Gino, and it loaded Azaan up with a lot of Penalty Dice.

At this point, I had a bolt of insight. Next round, I declared that the Contessa was going to take advantage of Azaan’s weakness and try to Banish him. I hadn’t even thought of this option till now.

To my amazement, Sean declared that he was going to try and stop her from Banishing Azaan.

Why’d they do this? For the Contessa, she felt enslaved to Azaan. He was way more powerful than she’d counted on when she Summoned him, and he was controlling her life in ways she didn’t like.

For Rasputin, he knew that if the Banish was successful, then Azaan wouldn’t be dead; he could be re-Summoned and come back after then again. We decided this meant they’ve had experience with Banished demons coming back to hurt before. But what I was most impressed by was that Sean knew what would happen – I’m still not sure if that was from reading about Banishing on-line, or from inferring what would happen through actual play.

The Banish was successful. The conflict ended. The Contessa was at their mercy.

Would Rasputin kill the Contessa? He had an opportunity - to push her down the elevator well as she walked past. Instead, Rasputin gave a speech. About how they all had to band together to defeat Kigongo.

***

Straight after that, Sebastian and Makeda had a moment. He didn’t want her to come with them when they hunted down Kigongo. She refused to obey him. We didn’t use the dice.

Instead, Makeda said she’d stay behind if Sebastian promised to marry her.

Sebastian said ‘Yes’.

***

I called an end to the scene then and there. In fact, to me it felt like an end to the game. So, after a short break to recover from the conflict, we debated whether the game was over or not.
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hix



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, after I come back from taking a break, I find Sean and Gino relaxing on the couch. When I join them, there’s a kind of post-game tone to our conversation.

I propose three options:

i) That was the end.
ii) We play on, because the game could wrap up very quickly (within a scene).
iii) We play on, aware that taking down Kigongo and the Swarm could become another three-part story.

To me, it feels like it could be the end. A slightly Whedonesque cliffhanger that sets up a whole bunch of new relationships and tensions in the setting – certainly enough to generate a new Kicker.

Sean pushes for option (ii). He’s got an idea of what he wants Rasputin to do – and Sean feels it could wrap up quite quickly.

After batting these ideas about, I realise that their Kickers (and their issues with the Contessa) haven’t been resolved. That settles things for me. We have to continue. And since that’s the conclusion Sean and Gino seemed to be reaching, for different reasons, we head back to the table.

***

Final scene.

A few weeks earlier, Sean had described to me his vision of Rasputin and Sebastian leading a motley crew of adventurers in the hunt for Kigongo. He got his wish. The crew also consisted of the Contessa and Baraka, and Jalali the Spider totem, who they picked up along the way.

Kigongo had summoned the Swarm to the middle of a Botantic Garden, far to the south-west of the city. Sean wanted his character to sneak up on Kigongo, and I decided that Jalali had no problem conferring Fast on him. Normally Jalali would be rebellious, but in this instance it gets him closer to Kigongo.

Rasputin proposes a deal – if Kigongo kills the Contessa, he’ll gets Jalali. Kigongo is into that.

Meanwhile Sebastian warns the Contessa about the double-cross.

A conflict begins. The Swarm descends on the Contessa, intending to sting her to death. She tries to Banish it – even though it’s incredibly powerful. Rasputin doesn’t act, and Gino says that his character, Sebastian, is going to hesitate. In my on-the-spot interpretation of the rules, I decided that the Swarm could either attack the Contessa or defend itself against the Banishing at full dice. The Contessa gets the initiative – so the Swarm aborts its attack & holds off on killing her

The Swarm hovers above the Contessa as she fails to Banish it.

This image sticks in my mind. It’s like a still from a Ralph Bakshi movie.

Finally, the Swarm wins initiative. They immerse and kill the Contessa. I describe a single horrifying image from it … to drive it home to the players, especially Gino.

Then (motivated by Rasputin) Kigongo tries to Banish the Swarm. He’s unsuccessful. Multiple times. Even with help. So, the Swarm takes off to destroy the city - and in the background of everything that follows, we hear the screams of people being killed.

***

Rasputin chucks Jalali, the Spider Totem, over to Kigongo. Rasputin hasn’t released Jalali from its Binding, but Rasputin doesn’t want the demon anymore. Or anything to do with demons.

***

Now, I’m not sure if I asked this or whether Gino raised it, but it goes back to my initial question this session. Does Sebastian love Makeda?

Gino decides, “Yes.”

And we all agreed that meant Makeda was dead.

***

So, end of story.

The Contessa was killed through Rasputin’s machinations, and he ended up responsible his three-year old son.

Despite this, both Rasputin and the Contessa decided to renounce demons – while Sebastian Bound a demon, and has grown in sorcerous power.

Rasputin and Sebastian got the tender, but ended up being sort-of responsible for the destruction of about a third of the city, and the death of the dictator’s daughter.

***

I think we achieved what we set out to do – tell a story about these characters that stands on its own. The game was solid, fun, and intense – and it unleashed a lot of great characterisation from Gino and Sean.

I also found that discussion of the rules and of events that don’t have much to do with the ‘Now’ can be carefully considered, while still being entertaining and engaging.
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Steve

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hix



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2007 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, I posted a summary of the game over at the Forge, which I'll copy here, below. I'm also wondering if anyone had any questions or observations from all this. Feel free to let rip!


*** SUMMARY ***

For me, the coolest thing about the whole three-session game was that the characters’ attitudes about using demons completely flipped from their starting positions. Rasputin, the hardcore seeker of forbidden knowledge, now hates demons and the way they seek to control him, while Sebastian is fully prepared to make deals with them in order to get revenge.

I think a lot of good stuff in this session came out of playing the demons really hard - their wants, their needs, the impact they have on their Sorcerors. A lot of the time this involved undercutting Rasputin and Sebastian, and portraying the demons as independent characters who weren’t necessarily concerned about their masters’ plans. And I found that portraying the demons came really naturally – they’re so primal and focused, it’s easy to figure out what they’d want in any given situation.

Finally, I started feeling very comfortable with making on-the-spot interpretations of the Sorceror rules. I feel like there are some basic principles there, like the way the currency works, and the one-action per round (together with the option to abort, and the ability to defend against an unlimited number of attacks) that make the game easy to run.
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Steve

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multi-dimensional: my script-writing blog.
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Mashugenah
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Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1239
Location: Gallifrey

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating reading. I'm curious though: this is supposed to be the "pulpy" sorcerer, but this seems very much more like more of a "period" sorcerer. What differentiates this game in your minds from a game set in modern times?
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hix



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 406
Location: Poison'd

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Mash,

Let's see. What made it pulp for me? (Also known as, how I ran it differently from a non-Swords & Sorcery game of Sorceror) ...

1. Lots more emphasis on the erotic, the sexual, and the seductive. I don't think any of us guys were uncomfortable with how far I pushed it, but sexual relationships, an association between sex and sorcery, and a general lack of inhibition were a hallmark of the setting.

2. Lots of referencing to previous and future adventures. Keeping the role of the characters in the overall saga firmly in mind as we played out the events of this game. Typically, games of Sorceror cover one or maybe two pivotal events in a character's life. This game had more ... scope.

3. It didn't feel period, it felt fantasy Africa. Mostly, I think this was the colour and atmosphere we all narrated into the game - treetop cities, windmill-powered factories, civilised dictatorships. It all added up to a nice, slightly off from the real world setting.

Hopefully Sean and Gino'll chip in.
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Steve

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multi-dimensional: my script-writing blog.
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